THE DEADMAU5 ADVENTURES, PART I

This week my sober adventures took me out with my new roommate, Simo. The man is currently doing his PhD in the way people interact with products…or something like that anyway. Very smart dude. He had some really cool insights into body language and environmental behaviour that I half understood then passed off in this blog as my own ideas. Cheers mate.

Arriving in the Valley around 10pm, Simo and I trundled up to Ric’s bar to pass the time before we were due to watch Deadmau5 play at Family around 12.

For those of you who haven’t been to Ric’s; I like to describe the place as.. a tangible, living definition of that highly subjective term, ‘Indie’.

The DJ upstairs often looks like they came directly out of your worst nightmare and he/she/it is just as likely to be playing ‘The VB ad jingle’ to a James Brown classic or something from the Wiggles’ latest work. It’s like a box of chocolates…Great for a bit of a laugh though.

Downstairs at Ric’s is this tiny, little stage and a large set of badly cleaned, spider-webbed speakers. Every weekend, Brisbane’s ‘local talent’ scream their lungs out through those speakers and unfortunately, sometimes only the ‘local’ part to the band’s description is true.

Simon and I spent most our time at Ric’s downstairs. We watched a guy with a haircut that looks like something from a nursery rhyme yell his lungs out while playing a drum kit. We we’re both quite impressed I must say. We also had a bit of a squizz around the room and got the ol’ HSM clipboard out.

We noticed that when the music gets loud, as it did this evening (and does in nearly all nightspots), two interesting things happen that lead people to significantly drink more.

1)    The conversation stops. If you leave a person to just the self-chatter in their mind and a drink in their hand, you can bet your house on which one of the two will be left with the person after 10min of being alone.

2)    Loud music makes people immediately become two-dimensional. Because you can’t talk, you can only judge a person two things. How they look and their body language. Therefore, people like me, who rely on their conversation over ‘suave-ness’ are often left feeling possibly similar to how a daddy long legs would feel.  ‘If I drink more, that ‘grinding’ thing that sexy people do on the dance floor will seem much easier’.

Part II. We head on up to Deadmau5…. tomorrow.

 

8 thoughts on “THE DEADMAU5 ADVENTURES, PART I

  1. They apparently have the world’s most poisonous venom but their teeth are so small that they can’t use it on most things.

    Cheers for the responses. 🙂

  2. As the volume goes up and the drinks go down, having a substitute for conversation and excuse for bad dancing is just the beginning. As promised Chris, here’s a report back for a typical Sunday Morning (4am) in a regional Emergency Department.

    One head split open, one face stomped (with broken wrist at no extra charge), one hit over the head with a frying pan and sliced while running through a plate glass door.

    One ‘found in the pizza hut garden by the ambulance, not sure why I’m here but can I have a cheese sandwich please’.

    There was a completely unrelated pair, one ‘drunk and bashed because I’m black’ and one ‘drunk and bashed by blacks’. We could have a whole separate discussion about this, even the language used to describe the two incidents says a lot. It makes me sad. Sorry.

    The most interesting person was a young bloke who bore an uncanny resemblance to a blogger who has stopped drinking for the year. Rest assured Chris, in a town in regional Australia, the anti-Chris is drinking your share for 2009. I’m standing in the ambulance bay trying to keep a straight face as a 20 year old with no shirt, bad tattoos, one shoe, fly undone, urine soaked crotch and dried blood covering half his face is busy throwing the biggest tantrum I’ve seen in a while. My initial hope that his father would help calm him down were dashed when Dad decided he’d join in.

    Just as my masterful use of all the calming tricks I could muster had almost worked their magic, the police turned up lights and sirens and the whole process started again. Eventually I convinced him to sit down for long enough to determine that he probably didn’t have a head injury. I would have preferred to keep him for observation, but we don’t have a kebab stand in the hospital so it was let him go or get the police back. He went home.

    Is there a lesson in this? This story could have been told any Sunday morning by hundreds of Emergency Department staff. This week was mild for me, I didn’t see any lives wrecked by binge drinking. The anti-Chris didn’t learning anything, although he will need a new pair of shoes.

    I’ve finished my night shifts, but next Sunday I’ll be working in the morning. I’ll get to see the wreckage of Saturday night when the hangovers have kicked in. Trying to make some sense of it all and in the spirit of HelloSundayMorning, this week I’m going to ask a few people if they know when a few drinks and some fun turned into a binge that ended in hospital. I’ll be sharing their insight (or lack of) here.

    1. Cheers for the insights Benno!

      Very well written! Really great to get that perspective and it is one which isn’t really given to too much public light.

      What I am really curious about your story though is two things..
      a) Why are people like that drinking? are they drinking to escape or become someone else? What causes them to get to that point of drunkenness?

      b) What do you believe would make them stop mid point in a drinking session and put their glass down?

      If you ever got the chance to find out this kind of information, I would be really keen to hear it!

  3. Good afternoon Mr. Hello Sunday morning. It is the year of ‘The 21st’ for me and so far it has been exceptional. People have been coming from everywhere to get to the past few shindigs. Long story short, it is easy to understand everyone has a different level of fun and insanity, influenced from their different backgrounds, but not easy to understand using an angle grinder to break into a cool room for grog, when the same grog is still being served outside, or to ride off a new car into a tree, or leaving your social filter behind and leaving a traumatized impression on most of the parents and bad impressions on not so well known guests. These are a few incidents which have stuck in my mind over the last month. I’ll put half these memorable stories down to stupidity, the other half down to massive self confidence issues.

    Some people just don’t have the self confidence to survive in a crowd of people who are not all friends. This is where most of these regretful stories began. Having known a few of these characters while growing up, the lack of confidence has possibly been shaped around younger social inexperience’s, (from small country towns maybe) and now they have accepted who they are, with those confidence issues, and have too much pride to deal with them properly…so they right themselves off, cause it’s the only answer for a larger or unfamiliar crowd.

    Probably stating the obvious with self confidence issues v alcohol/drug issues but it has been a bit too clear these last few weeks that people have to take things to the next level to cope. Maybe you can put this puzzle together for me Chris?

    1. AJ you just posted the best comment I have read since the beginning of this blog! You are a very insightful person.

      You are right on the money with the self confidence thing and especially about the coping with not being able to connect with people. The team and I are currently building a model at the moment that will hopefully give you a better understanding of the puzzle as to why people go ahead and right themselves off. Look forward to showing you.

      I think the important thing to recognise is that the first step of the process for your friends is self-awareness of the problem (maybe telling these people that what they are doing is because they aren’t comfortable to be themselves is a pretty sobering thing to say to anyone). Secondly is showing them how they should behave (people learn by watching what other people do). And finally reenforcement of correct behaviour without making the wrong behaviour ‘bad’. Recognising that everything that we do is a choice. Drink number 1, 4, 6 and 23 are all individual choices we make.

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